Wednesday Warriors: Tiefling Crusader

I talked last week about the difficulty in emulating the healing abilities of clerics and paladins from Dungeons & Dragon style fantasy games in Fate. This week’s character was made long before the half elf cleric, and instead of dealing the issue, I just sidestepped it. Which is why, despite being a paladin, the tiefling crusader has no healing abilities. Instead, the character is more like a holy knight, rather like the avenger class from Dungeons & Dragons 4e, with their divine power being channeled into offensive stunts.

One of the character’s aspects, My Horns And My Heritage Mean Nothing, came about due to my confusion regarding tieflings in D&D. Every D&D book I’ve read that includes tieflings as a playable race says they are mistrusted and feared because of their infernal heritage. Yet tieflings get a bonus to their Charisma. That has never made sense to me. If Charisma is the stat which matters for social interaction skills like Bluff, Diplomacy,  and Persuade, won’t people be less likely to be swayed by someone from a group that is described as being “universally mistrusted and reviled”? I’ve never been able to square that in my mind. So the My Horns And My Heritage Mean Nothing aspect is the character telling themselves their infernal ancestry doesn’t matter for the profession they’ve chosen. Their other aspects are fairly straightforward. One that forces them to seek out evil; one about the divine power they’ve been called to serve; and one about their consecrated armor, their most notable piece of equipment.

The crusader’s stunts were fairly easy to come up with as well. Once I knew I was focusing on the offensive powers, a “smite” type stunt seemed obvious. Doing extra damage against supernatural opponents is a classic paladin ability, and in Fate the foe’s type would be determined by an appropriate aspect. (It’s worth pointing out that a player technically can create an advantage to attach an aspect like Infernal or Undead onto an opponent, allowing the crusader to use their Holy Smite stunt on something they normally shouldn’t. This is a case of “follow the fiction” though, meaning the player needs a very good reasons as to why their character can do something like this. A necromancer or some kind of transmuting-based magician might be able to do it with a spell, but generally speaking, characters shouldn’t be able to turn some hapless villager into a demon with a snap of their fingers.)

The stunt Face Me Cur! came right out of the Fate Core book, and was too appropriate not to use. I imagine the crusader getting in opponent’s faces, drawing their attention away from other characters as a way to protect them. A stunt making it harder for an opponent to affect the mental state of the crusader seemed like a good choice, and was a nice defensive stunt to balance the other two.


Tiefling Crusader

High Concept: Domineering Tiefling Crusader
Motivation: I Must Cleanse The World of Corruption
Aspect: My Horns And My Heritage Mean Nothing
Aspect: Bahamut’s Most Fanatical Zealot
Aspect: Consecrated Heavy Plate Armor and Shield

Approaches:

  • Careful: Fair (+2)
  • Clever: Average (+1)
  • Flashy: Average (+1)
  • Forceful: Good (+3)
  • Quick: Fair (+2)
  • Sneaky: Mediocre (+0)

Stunts:

  • Face Me, Cur!: Because I know how to provoke my foes, after I issue a challenge by Flashily creating an advantage on my opponent, I may use a free invoke to become the target of that character’s next relevant action, drawing their attention away from another target.
  • Holy Smite: Because I can channel divine energy through my weapon, I get +2 to Forcefully attack a supernatural opponent, represented by an aspect such as Corrupted, Demonic, Infernal, or Undead.
  • Unshakable Faith: Because I can recite the Liturgies of Faith, whenever an opponent attempts to create an advantage affecting my mental state, such as Afraid, Confused, or Charmed, I get +2 to Carefully oppose their action.

Stress: ▢ ▢ ▢
Consequences:

  • Mild (2):
  • Moderate (4):
  • Severe (6):

You can download the Domineering Tiefling Crusader as an A4-sized PDF or a letter-sized PDF.

Domineering_Tiefling_Crusader_A4

The character illustration is the free paper mini made by Printable Heroes. The free versions are backless, but if you support the Patreon at just $1 a month you get minis with backs. For $2 a month you get access to “reskins”, and for $3 a month you get multiple color options. That’s a fantastic deal.

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Wednesday Warriors: Tiefling Crusader

Wednesday Warriors: Half Elf Cleric

Towards the beginning of the month I got a request on Twitter to make a cleric. Along with the fighter, the thief, and the wizard (and perhaps the bard), the cleric is a classic Dungeons & Dragons fantasy archetype. But I was somewhat hesitant to make one. Part of that reluctance was because I’d already made a Dwarven runepriest, which I rather envision being like a cleric. I also have a Tiefling crusader that will be posted in the coming weeks. But a bigger part of my reluctance was due to how Fate handles damage and injury.

In Fate, damage and injury, whether physical, mental, or something else, is represented by stress. Stress is temporary damage; fatigue, bruising, embarrassment, or something else, depending on the source of the attack. Characters have stress boxes, and mark off a box or equal or greater value to the stress they suffer. Regardless of how much stress a character takes though, it all goes away after they’ve had a chance to catch their breath and relax, usually at the end of the scene. If a character is dealt stress but the player can’t mark any of their stress boxes to absorb the, they get taken out of the scene. That means their opponent gets to decide what happens to them, and in a Fate fantasy game that’s inspired by D&D and Pathfinder, getting taken out probably means the character is killed. Or at the very least captured.

Characters also have a number of consequence slots. A player can mark a consequence slot to absorb a number of points of stress; 2 for a mild, 4 for a moderate, or 6 points of stress for a severe consequence. Unlike stress boxes though, consequence slots don’t clear so quickly. Mild consequences clear after a whole scene, moderate after a whole session, and severe after a whole scenario. On top of that, consequences are aspects that can be invoked and compelled like any other. But as consequences are aspects, a player will earn a Fate point when an opponent invokes them, or someone compels them. They are part of the Fate point economy, and allowing players to clear Consequences too quickly deprives them of those Fate points.

I’m discussing all this because one of the most common abilities of D&D style fantasy clerics is the power to heal injury. Emulating that in Fate was causing me problems given how stress and consequences work, so I just avoided making a cleric. But I’m never one to turn down a (reasonable) request, and I think I found a decent solution.

The Lay On Hands stunt allows the cleric an attempt to overcome the target’s consequence. If successful, rather than being completely removed, the severity of the consequence decrease by one level. Severe to moderate, moderate, to mild, and mild to gone. The difficulty to reduce the consequence increases with the level of the consequence being healed, and the stunt costs a Fate point to use. With a Fair Careful approach , the cleric will more than likely succeed at clearing a mild consequence, will need to invoke an aspect to reduce a moderate consequence, and will need to invoke several aspects or have help to reduce a severe consequence.

It’s an expensive stunt to use, but I feel that’s necessary to prevent the cleric from being able to completely heal people multiple times a session. Players choose when to take consequences, and like anything in Fate, aspects chosen by the player are things they think are interesting. They should hang around for a bit so players get to make those choices matter.

 


Half Elf Cleric

High Concept: Resolute Half Elf Celric
Motivation: I Must Succor Those in Need
Aspect: Born Amid the Boughs of Brambleholme
Aspect: Trained at the Temple of Nitria
Aspect: Steel-shod Holy Staff of St. Pachomius

Approaches:

  • Careful: Fair (+2)
  • Clever: Mediocre (+0)
  • Flashy: Fair (+2)
  • Forceful: Good (+3)
  • Quick: Average (+1)
  • Sneaky: Average (+1)

Stunts:

  • Front-line Faith: Because I am a capable melee combatant, whenever I Forcefully defend against a physical attack, I suffer one less stress.
  • Lay On Hands: Because I magically knit the flesh of my allies with a touch, I can spend a Fate point to Carefully overcome a Consequence representing physical injury on another character. The opposition is equal to the level of the Consequence (2, 4, or 6), and if successful, the Consequence’s severity is reduced by one level, or cleared if Mild.
  • Turn Undead: Because I can channel divine light, I can Flashily create an advantage on every Undead character in my zone, giving a Disrupted, Panicked, or Weakened aspect to each defender I succeed against.

Stress: ▢ ▢ ▢
Consequences:

  • Mild (2):
  • Moderate (4):
  • Severe (6):

You can download the Resolute Half Elf Cleric as an A4-sized PDF or a letter-sized PDF.

Resolute_HalfElf_Cleric_A4

The character illustration is the free paper mini made by Printable Heroes. The free versions are backless, but if you support the Patreon at just $1 a month you get minis with backs. For $2 a month you get access to “reskins”, and for $3 a month you get multiple color options. That’s a fantastic deal.

Wednesday Warriors: Half Elf Cleric

Wednesday Warriors: Human Ranger

Another classic fantasy RPG character type I had to make is the bow-wielding ranger. While the idea for the stunts were fairly easy to come up with (a ranger’s areas of expertise are usually things like ranged combat, woodcraft and survival skills, and excellent vision), coming up with the wording for a few of them proved difficult. Not difficult because Fate couldn’t handle them, mind you. Difficult because I wanted to get them “perfect”, and perfect is the enemy of done.

I’ve mentioned before about how I like using “at the start of a conflict” stunts with monsters to help establish the feeling of being in the creature’s lair or home turf. But using it for character is a neat way to represent an effect that is “always on”, like with the High Elf Minstrel’s reputation. It can also represent the character doing something incredibly quickly, like with the ranger’s Already in My Sights stunt. If the player rolls well enough, the character can stack two free invokes on their first attack roll of the conflict, potentially ending things before they even really start.

The Expert Woodcraft stunt is kind of like two stunts in one. It comes into play when overcoming an obstacle and creating an advantage as long as the action is related to hunting and tracking. As it affects two different action types, I felt reducing the bonus to +1, instead of the usual +2, was a way to balance it against what other characters got. Eyes of a Hawk is a pretty standard stunt. It grants a +2 bonus to a specific approach when used in a certain narrow situation. I normally don’t like to double up on approaches or action types for a character’s stunts, but I’ve done both of those here: two of the stunts are about overcoming obstacles and two stunts rely on Quick.

None of the other approaches seemed to make sense for the Eyes of a Hawk stunt though.  Sometimes the best way to decide on the appropriate approach for an action (whether writing up stunts or adjudicating things while playing) is to decide which approaches don’t work. Flashy and Forceful don’t make any sense when the character is observing something. Sneaky doesn’t either, unless the stunt was about watching things while remaining hidden. Which it isn’t. Clever or Careful could have worked, but that would have implied spending time observing the character’s surroundings, which the stunt isn’t about either. That leaves only Quick. Which is fine. Hawks spot things quickly after all, right?

 


Human Ranger

High Concept: Swift Human Ranger
Motivation: I Must Enforce the Natural Order
Aspect: Raised by Wood Elf Druids
Aspect: Disciple of the Devourer Wurm
Aspect: Chameleon-Drake Scale Cloak

Approaches:

  • Careful: Fair (+2)
  • Clever: Average (+1)
  • Flashy: Mediocre (+0)
  • Forceful: Average (+1)
  • Quick: Good (+3)
  • Sneaky: Fair (+2)

Stunts:

  • Already in My Sights: Because I can draw and aim my bow in the blink of an eye, at the start of a conflict, before anyone else acts, I may attempt to Quickly create an In My Sights advantage on one of my opponents.
  • Expert Woodcraft: Because I am skilled in woodcraft, I get +1 to Carefully overcome obstacles and create advantages related to hunting or tracking.
  • Eyes of a Hawk: Because I have the eyesight of a hawk, I get +2 to Quickly overcome aspects representing impairments to vision, such as long distances, fog or smoke, and dim lighting. (But not total darkness.)

Stress: ▢ ▢ ▢
Consequences:

  • Mild (2):
  • Moderate (4):
  • Severe (6):

You can download the Swift Human Ranger as an A4-sized PDF or a letter-sized PDF.

Swift_Human_Ranger_A4

The character illustration is the free paper mini made by Printable Heroes. The free versions are backless, but if you support the Patreon at just $1 a month you get minis with backs. For $2 a month you get access to “reskins”, and for $3 a month you get multiple color options. That’s a fantastic deal.

Wednesday Warriors: Human Ranger

Wednesday Warriors: Halfling Thief

Just like the “intelligence-based” wizard from last week, the halfling thief is such a classic fantasy RPG character type I had to make one. (Thank you Bilbo Baggins.) But the character took longer to write up than some of the others I’ve done so far. I’ve mentioned before that I try to spread a character’s stunts around, both in regards to the action and and the approach the stunt modifies. But some fantasy character types seem very focused on a fairly narrow area of expertise. The fighter is one, and the thief is another.

It would have been very easy to make Sneaky the thief’s lead approach. Because of how Fate Accelerated approaches work, creeping along in the shadows, backstabbing an unaware target, picking pockets, and even picking locks could be handled with the Sneaky approach. Stunts that grant bonuses to these “thief-y” actions would also have been really appropriate. But that also would have been rather boring.

One result of Fate Accelerated‘s approaches caring about how a character does something instead of what they are doing, is that the same approach can cover many different situations. This can lead to players “spamming an approach” – meaning the player intentionally tries to finagle things so they get to roll with their character’s highest approach as often as possible. Players and GMs are meant to use the approach that makes the most sense based on the fictional situation at hand, but there is nothing forcing the player to use different approaches.

Having stunts that use different approaches is a way to encourage players to branch out and use more than a one approach all the time. (Not that I necessarily expect people to do that.) But much like the fighter, making stunts that were tied to different approaches and actions yet still evoked the flavor of a fantasy thief was rather hard to do. I didn’t really need a stunt to emulate lock picking, as the equipment aspect of Expertly Crafted Set Of Thieves Tools could cover that. Instead I went with a stunt that grants a bonus when overcoming physical barriers. I always try to have a stunt that reinforces the adjective in the character’s high concept, and moving around during a fight seemed to fit nicely here. Moving into an adjacent zone for free doesn’t feel like it equals two shifts on the ladder (which is generally what a stunt’s effect is worth) so it works on success with style for two actions; attack and defense. Lastly, because the character is a thief and a halfling, I went with a stunt that granted a bonus to avoid notice.

As I’m using the Weight rules from War of Ashes: Fate of Agaptus for the fantasy monsters I’ve made, I could have given the character a Weight 0.5 (Small). But that would have meant any medium-sized opponent got to change one of their dice to a “+” when opposing the character. That doesn’t feel very heroic. Plus, the aspect Nimble Halfling Thief can be compelled when the “halfling” part would cause interesting problems because of the character’s size. It could also be invoked by an opponent for the same reason. That seems more fair, as it will only come up at interesting times, and the player gets a Fate point for having some trouble thrown at them.


Halfling Thief

High Concept: Nimble Halfling Thief
Motivation: I Must Steal A Legendary Treasure
Aspect: Raised On The Deck Of A Pirate Galley
Aspect: More Luck Than I Know What To Do With
Aspect: Expertly Crafted Set Of Thieves Tools

Approaches:

  • Careful: Average (+1)
  • Clever: Fair (+2)
  • Flashy: Average (+1)
  • Forceful: Mediocre (+0)
  • Quick: Good (+3)
  • Sneaky: Fair (+2)

Stunts:

  • Acrobatic Fighter: Because I constantly move during a fight, whenever I Quickly attack or defend and succeed with style, I may immediately move one zone instead of gaining a boost.
  • Escape Artist: Because I can always find a way out, I get +2 to Cleverly overcome obstacles and aspects representing physical bonds or impediments to escape, such as Behind Bars, Tied Up, or Superior Locks.
  • Low Profile: Because I am small and unassuming, I get +2 to Sneakily create an advantage such as Beneath Notice, Inconspicuous, or Totally Not Important, representing people overlooking, ignoring, or not paying attention to me due to my size.

Stress: ▢ ▢ ▢
Consequences:

  • Mild (2):
  • Moderate (4):
  • Severe (6):

You can download the Nimble Halfling Thief as an A4-sized PDF or a letter-sized PDF.

Nimble_Halfling_Thief_A4

The character illustration is the free paper mini made by Printable Heroes. The free versions are backless, but if you support the Patreon at just $1 a month you get minis with backs. For $2 a month you get access to “reskins”, and for $3 a month you get multiple color options. That’s a fantastic deal.

Wednesday Warriors: Halfling Thief

Wednesday Warriors: Human Wizard

If you saw yesterday’s post, you know I’m having internet issues at home. As a result, there wasn’t a Monday Monsters post this week, and this post will be a bit short. I’ll try to make up for it by posting something special for next week’s Monday Monsters entry.

An “intelligence-based” wizard is such a classic fantasy RPG character type that I felt I had to make one. But I also didn’t want to get bogged down with spell lists, schools of magic, and casting styles. You can absolutely do that with Extras in Fate and Fate Accelerated, but I wanted to keep things simple. As Fate Accelerated uses approaches instead of skills, the game doesn’t really care about what a character is doing, but how they’re doing it. That means a hardy knight swinging a sword as hard as they can and a wizard casting a big, powerful fireball spell will both use the Forceful approach.

On the one hand, that’s great. Players don’t have to worry about the mechanics of what their character is doing. It’s all description, and that allows players to narrate their characters doing awesome things without the game fighting against them. But that also means it’s sometimes hard to differentiate characters. A wizard with a good Forceful approach can use it to cast a big spell or to swing a sword just as hard as the knight. And if the knight learned to cast some spells? They can use their Forceful approach for a big fireball. Which is where aspects and stunts come into play, naturally.

Some aspects are called “permission aspects”, and they give a character the fictional permission to do certain things. Spellcasting is a good example. Unless a character has an aspect that either implies or explicitly states they can use magic, then they can’t. Aspects like Battlemage, Arcane Pistoleer, and Runepriest are all permission aspects in that way, as they indicate the character can use magic. A character with “wizard” in their high concept aspect, very clearly has permission to use magic.


Human Wizard

High Concept: Ingenious Human Wizard
Motivation: I Must Atone For The Evil I Unleashed
Aspect: Former Master Of The Ebon Circle
Aspect: Much Older Than I Look
Aspect: The Legendary Staff Of Avan-Rakash

Approaches:

  • Careful: Fair (+2)
  • Clever: Good (+3)
  • Flashy: Fair (+2)
  • Forceful: Average (+1)
  • Quick: Mediocre (+0)
  • Sneaky: Average (+1)

Stunts:

  • Adaptive Magic: Because I can modify my magic on the fly, whenever I
    Cleverly attack with a spell and succeed with style, I can create an aspect
    representing a magical effect with a free invoke instead of gaining a boost.
  • Counterspell: Because I can cast negating spells, once per scene when I use
    a spell to Flashily defend against magic, I may shift down my opponent’s
    result by one step. If I do, the scene gains a Dangerous Arcane Feedback
    situation aspect with no free invoke.
  • Eldritch Lore: Because I have studied tomes of occult knowledge, I get
    +2 to Cleverly overcome obstacles if I can explain how such knowledge is
    relevant to the situation at hand.

Stress: ▢ ▢ ▢
Consequences:

  • Mild (2):
  • Moderate (4):
  • Severe (6):

You can download the Ingenious Human Wizard as an A4-sized PDF or a letter-sized PDF.

Ingenious_Human_Wizard_A4

The character illustration is the free paper mini made by Printable Heroes. The free versions are backless, but if you support the Patreon at just $1 a month you get minis with backs. For $2 a month you get access to “reskins”, and for $3 a month you get multiple color options. That’s a fantastic deal.

Wednesday Warriors: Human Wizard

Wednesday Warriors: High Elf Arcane Pistoleer

I wanted to give these fantasy adventurer posts a snappier title than just “FAE Fantasy”. When I was only making fantasy character sheets the name made sense, but now that I’ve started making fantasy monsters as well, it no longer fits. Plus, the site itself is called Fate Accelerated Fantasy. I like alliteration, in case you couldn’t tell with “Monday Monsters” and “Saturday Surprise”, so I decided to go with “Wednesday Warriors”.  The characters posted here aren’t all warriors, (there’s wizards, rogues, clerics, and bards as well), but it’s a decent enough name.

I ran another poll on Twitter and Google Plus last week asking which adventurer people wanted to see for future posts. I should have expected the High Elf Arcane Pistoleer to blow everything else out of the water, and it totally did. With half the votes on both polls, which was a bit of a surprise. So, without further ado, here it is.

The character’s stunts were a bit hard to come up with. As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, I like to spread the stunts around in both the approach they use and the action they apply to. I knew the character needed a stunt related to their pistols, and I usually link any kind of attacking stunt to the character’s lead approach. Someone carefully shooting guns implied they’d take their time and aim, which could have been done a number of ways. But I liked the image of the character shooting at one foe and having already calmly lined up their next shot, and allowing the player to stick an “aiming” aspect on another target on a high attack roll emulated that fairly well.

After deciding the character was an investigator, I wanted a stunt that reinforced that. Flashy and Quick were going to be the linked approach, but loudly berating someone to obtain evidence (a Flashy action as it would draw attention) didn’t seem to fit a calculating. So that left Quick. That implied a Sherlock Holmes level of near-instant awareness and analysis (otherwise it wouldn’t be Quick), which made me think of cold reading. Turns out there’s a cold read technique of throwing out a bunch of very likely statements and reading body language/reaction called “shotgunning”. That was too good to pass up for a character carrying guns.

Last was a stunt to reinforce that the character was part of an organization. Summoning junior members as backup seemed good. I’ve mentioned before about how “once per session” stunts don’t sit that well with me, but in this case I think it makes sense. It’s something that shouldn’t happen too often, as the character is meant to operate alone most of the time (mainly so the player and GM don’t have to worry about extra characters). Having the stunt cost a Fate point wasn’t limiting enough, though the idea of allowing the player to spend multiple Fate points to request a small army of junior Bluecoats did cross my mind.

As with many of the characters I make, I leave the aspects open to interpretation. It’s up to the player (and the group) to decide what exactly the Crystal Tower is, who the Bluecoats are, and who the queen they serve is. I like providing ideas and allowing other people to flesh them out and make them their own.

 


High Elf Arcane Pistoleer

High Concept: Calculating High Elf Arcane Pistoleer
Motivation: I Must Not Dishonor My Regiment
Aspect: Turned Away from the Crystal Tower
Aspect: Inspector in Her Majesty’s Bluecoats
Aspect: Pair of Ornate Spellock Pistols

Approaches:

  • Careful: Good (+3)
  • Clever: Average (+1)
  • Flashy: Fair (+2)
  • Forceful: Average (+1)
  • Quick: Fair (+2)
  • Sneaky: Mediocre (+0)

Stunts:

  • Pinpoint Accuracy: Because my aim is true, whenever I Carefully attack with my pistols and succeed with style, I can give my opponent or a nearby target an In My Sights aspect with a free invoke instead of gaining a boost.
  • Senior Officer: Because of my rank, once per session I can request backup from Bluecoat HQ in the form of two junior members, no questions asked. These are both Fair Nameless NPCs with Good (+2) Careful, Average (+1) Flashy and Quick approaches, and one Stress box each.
  • Shotgunning: Because I excel at cold reading, as long as I can observe a person’s appearance, mannerisms, and reactions, I get +2 to Quickly create an advantage to discover aspects about that person.

Stress: ▢ ▢ ▢
Consequences:

  • Mild (2):
  • Moderate (4):
  • Severe (6):

You can download the Calculating High Elf Arcane Pistoleer as an A4-sized PDF or a letter-sized PDF.

Calculating_HighElf_ArcanePistoleer_A4

The character illustration is the free paper mini made by Printable Heroes. The free versions are backless, but if you support the Patreon at just $1 a month you get minis with backs. For $2 a month you get access to “reskins”, and for $3 a month you get multiple color options. That’s a fantastic deal.

Wednesday Warriors: High Elf Arcane Pistoleer

FAE Fantasy: Updates

I hadn’t intended to make a Friday post. For the time being, Monday is monsters, Wednesday is adventurers, and every other Saturday (or so) is going to be something special. But I’ve made some changes to the character sheets, so I thought an update was in order.

First up: the Hardy Human Knight from Wednesday. I got some very good feedback on the character over on the Fate Accelerated Fantasy Google Plus site. Markus Wagner suggested that having to spend a Fate point and limiting the effect to once a session was too steep a cost for the “reduce a consequence” stunt. After some discussion I agreed and came up with an alternative; a second mild consequence slot.

In Fate Accelerated Edition, stress clears at the end of each scene. Stress represents exhaustion, scrapes and bruises, and other minor things that go away after a few minutes of rest. Consequences are more lasting effects. Mild consequence (those that mitigate 2-shifts of stress) clear up at the end of the scene, provided the character has had a chance to rest. Moderate consequences (those that mitigate 4-shifts of stress) clear up at the end of the next session, as long as it makes sense in the story. Severe consequences (those that mitigate 6-shifts of stress) clear up at the end of a scenario, again provided it makes sense in the story.

When a character takes a hit, the player can mark a single stress box and any number of consequence to absorb the stress. So, a character who takes a 4-shift hit could mark their 2-shift stress box and take a mild consequence to avoid being taken out. Both of those will clear up at the end of the scene, but they wouldn’t have many stress boxes left. Or they could take a moderate consequence instead. That will take longer to go away, but all three of their stress boxes are clear. A character with two mild consequences who takes a 4-shift hit could mark both mild consequences, still has all their stress boxes clear, and will clear both consequences (and any stress taken) at the end of the scene. Having a second mild consequence is obviously very useful.

The downside of consequences is that they are aspects, and like all other aspects, they can be compelled by the GM and invoked by other characters. When a player marks a consequence for their character, whomever landed the attack gets a free invoke on that consequence, just as if they’d made a new aspect. Because, in a sense, they have. So while having more consequence slots means you can absorb more stress, it also means you’ll have more aspects for your opponents to take advantage of.

But Fate points flowing around the table as players create, invoke, and compel aspects is a big part of the Fate game. So rather than a “fancy” stunt, I’m fine with giving the Hardy Human Knight a second mild consequence slot as one of her stunts. The character sheet has been updated, and all the old links should point to the correct place. But just in case, here are the links to the A4-sized PDF and the letter-sized PDF again.

Hardy_Human_Knight_A4-(1)

Next, I’ve updated all the previous character and monster sheets so that aspects are shown in dark blue text. I like how that makes them quick to identify when looking at the sheets. All the original links on the original blog  posts and on the collected list page should have updated.

As I said, I doubt that Friday posts will be a common occurrence. Two posts per week, plus one or two special Saturday posts is keeping me busy enough already. I’ll reserve Fridays for updates and corrections, which will hopefully be few and far between.

FAE Fantasy: Updates